Juniper Squamata First Styling

Today I carried out the first styling of a Juniper Squamata, which was dug from my garden 3 years ago

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The next 2 photographs are a reminder of how it looked immediately after it was removed from the ground

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This is how it looked after the removal of some branches and a re-pot in 2016

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This is how it looked at the start of todays work, the top has filled out well in the past year. I have decided that this side will be the future front of the tree. As I looked at this image, I felt that the top of the tree was too straight and there was more foliage at the top of the trunk than I needed to complete the image I was aiming for.

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This is how it looked when the work was completed. The foliage was removed from the top of the trunk and the branches were jinned. Now, the relative proportion of the remaining foliage seems more balanced with the long thin trunk. I was also able to introduce more movement at the top of the trunk with a combination of coiled wire and guy wires

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The next stages in this trees development  will be to correct the planting angle at the next re-pot; develop the foliage pads and introduce a long shari which extends the length of the trunk.

Rewiring a Literati Scots Pine

I had a visit from my good friend Gerry earlier in the week. He brought along a Scots Pine to get some advice on the next stage of its development. I have had a close involvement with this tree over the past 3 years. We agreed some time ago that the best way forward for this tree would be to train it as a Literati pine.

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This is how it looked before this weeks work. After much deliberation we decided that the lowest right hand branch should be removed to emphasise the trees’ natural movement to the left

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The next picture shows the lower right branch with foliage removed and the remainder of the branch jined. The lower left branch has also been thinned and wired into place. This is as far as we got during Gerry’s visit

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He kindly left the tree with me and I was able to finish the wiring at the weekend

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This is how it looks at the moment

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This is how it looked after the previous wiring in 2015

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And this is the earliest picture I have of the tree taken in 2014

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Winter has come to Scotland

The night time temperatures have plummeted in my part of Scotland this week to around -5 degrees C., heralding an early start to our winter. I still have some trees outside but they will all have to come inside today.

Here is a photograph of one of my Scots Pines, which I took this morning. It will give you an idea of the conditions that the trees are putting up with at the moment.

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Remarkably, this Kiyohime maple, which has been in the greenhouse for about a month is still managing to cling on to its’ Autumn colour. It’s the last of my deciduous trees to do so.

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Ayr Winter Image Show 2016 Pictures

 

 

I drove through blizzards and flood water yesterday to attend the third Ayr Bonsai Club Winter Image Show in the historic village of Alloway on the Ayrshire coast. The numbers of people attending this year were slightly down on previous years due to the weather but those who braved the elements and made the effort to get there were not disappointed. This show grows from strength to strength with each passing season and the quality of the trees and the way they are displayed just gets better. This year, the organisers set up an area to photograph the trees in an adjacent room, which has made a terrific difference to the picture quality.

I think my favourite tree on the day was this larch over rock created by Ian McMaster and planted on a natural stone that was collected from a beach not very far from the show venue.

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There just wasn’t enough time to photograph every tree at the show so here is a gallery of those that made the biggest impact on me.

To see a larger image in gallery mode, click on any image

 

 

Tall Scots Pine 2nd Styling

Over our last 2 “get together” sessions, Gerry and I have been busy styling his tall scots pine.

This cultivar of pinus sylvestris, which I think is either beuvronensis or watereri has a good nebari, excellent movement in the trunk and a good dark green foliage colour. The trunk is relatively thin for its height.

Last year Gerry took this tree to a Marc Noelanders workshop to get some advice on how to take it forward. I took the first 2 pictures at the workshop last year, unfortunately I didn’t get a picture before and immediately after this work.

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This is how the tree looked earlier this year when it was re-potted.

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Today we completed the work in beautiful autumn sunshine.

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Halfway through the process.

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Work completed for now.This is how the tree is looking at the moment.

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Pinus Sylvestris First Styling

I acquired this scots pine in April 2010. I liked the movement in the trunk and thought that it could make a nice literati at some time in the future.

This is how it looked in 2010 (Apologies for the poor quality of the picture)

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In 2011, I opened up the foliage and re-planted it into this unglazed Japanese pot

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In the winter of 2012 it fell off the bench and the pot was smashed. I quickly re-housed it in the pot you can see in the next picture and changed the angle of the trunk to a more upright position.

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It received its first full wiring today and this is how it looks at the moment. I like this tree very much. As the foliage develops and the ramification gets tighter I think it will mature into a nice bunjin style pine.

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Re-Potting a Tall Scots Pine

I had Gerry in the garden today to get some advice on the potting of one of his large pines. In a normal year it might be considered too late in the season to attempt such a thing; but this year it has been so cold and wet that all of our trees are a bit behind where they should be at this time. As the tree is very healthy and the candles have not yet fully opened, we decided to give it a go.

His plan for the future is to train this tree in the literati style, so he wanted to get the tree out of the large oval pot and into something smaller and round..

This is how it looked at the start of the work.

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This is the new pot by Ian Baillie. It’s a little deeper than the old pot and the front to back measurements are the same.

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Out of the old pot and it’s just a case of shaping an oval root mass into the round.

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We added additional mycorrhizal fungi to the new soil mix

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And this is how it looks at the moment. The tree will be kept in the shade for the next few months and the soil will be kept slightly moist until it shows strong signs of recovery.

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